walkhighlands

Monthly Archives: May 2020

The Castles of the High Fells

We’ve been separated from the mountains for so long. I’m sure I’m not alone in feeling them missing from my life.

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Posted in Magazine

Legal killing of 1-in-5 Scottish beavers spotlights need for fresh approach

The killing of 87 beavers in Scotland – one fifth of the country’s population – proves there is an urgent need for humans to live more sympathetically alongside beavers across Britain, the Beaver Trust has said. The Trust said lethal

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Hillwalking and the plan to ease lockdown

Nicola Sturgeon yesterday announced the four stage route map for Scotland to ease its Covid-19 lockdown restrictions. Today Scottish Mountain Rescue have issued new guidance to hillwalkers. None of the changes are yet in place, but it is expected that

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Posted in Access issues, Magazine, Walkhighlands news, Walking News

Life under lockdown: Stories from those working in rural tourism and the outdoors

Scotland has been in lockdown now for more than eight weeks, and many of us have been missing getting out in the hills or visiting their favourite places. But how is this affecting the businesses that serve us all? Tourism

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Posted in Magazine, Walking News

The Yellow-Eyed Bird of Glen Dubh-Lighe

The big man grunted as he drove the shovel into the earth, his breath misting in the cold winter air. His two companions watched the spade rise and fall as the mound of soil grew. They stood beside the pile

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Posted in Magazine

Plotting a route back to the hills

Mountaineering organisations are working together towards a return to hill walking and climbing in Scotland. As we approach the end of week eight of lockdown, mountaineering organisations in Scotland are asking the hill walking and climbing community to ‘hold the

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Posted in Access issues, Magazine, Walking News




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.