walkhighlands


Gear review: Keen Wanderer Low WP walking shoes

Recommended Price: £109.99
Weight: 1280g pair (size 10.5)

I’ve been a fan of Keen Targhee walking boots for a few years now; my feet are wide across the toes and I’ve always found them extremely comfortable on the hill. So I was interested in trying out these trail walking shoes (which are also available as a boot).

The first thing you notice is the weight – at size 10.5, a pair weighs 1.28kg, which is comparable to many boots. This helps make them feel very sturdy – almost clumpy; the uppers are suede and nubuck leather with a generous padded ankle cup, whilst inside there is plenty of cushioning. In use the comparatively heavy weight didn’t bother me so much as I expected – the shoes are extremely comfortable, as is usual with Keen, and the construction suggests that they are going to be more durable than some of the lighter Keen models. The Wanderers feature Keen’s own waterproof lining, which has kept my feet dry to date; these linings never last forever, though with the thick outers I’m hoping these will stay waterproof for longer than most. On the other hand the linings make the shoes even warmer – I wouldn’t want to wear these on a hot summer’s day. Aside from that I found them suitable on a variety of terrain when there’s no snow.

The sole unit is Keen’s own but I have found it grips well on a variety of surfaces. The round laces tend to come loose on occasion.

One thing to note is that the Wanderers seem to run half a size or so smaller than the Targhees, so make sure you try a pair on before you buy.

Likes: Comfort, sturdy construction.
Dislikes: Heavy, too warm for hotter weather.




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