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Gear review: Mammut Chamuera Jacket

Recommended Price: £99
Weight: 600g (men’s large)

Fleece jackets seem to have fallen in popularity a little in recent years, with more walkers opting instead for mid-layers filled with synthetic insulation which offer the best warmth-to-weight ratio. There’s still a lot to be said for a good fleece though; they wash well, dry quickly, and whilst cheaper ones are prone to pilling, the best are very durable.

Few fleeces, though, look quite as smart as the Mammut Chamuera. Whilst the interior is conventionally fleecy and warm, the outer face of the jacket has a woven finish which avoids any pilling. It’s printed with a herring-bone like effect that looks a little like traditional tweed. When combined with the well-tailored cut, with angular shoulders and a stand-up collar, the Chamuera is an ideal choice if you are looking for a jacket that looks just as smart around town as it does when out in the woods or up on the hill.

Performance-wise, I’ve found it to be quite a bit warmer than a conventional Polartec 200 fleece, and more wind-resistant too. It works equally well as an outer layer in dry weather as it does under a hard shell. There are two large zipped side-pockets; the lining of these is cotton which will slow the drying time.

The Chamuera is available in six sizes and four colours for men, whilst the women’s version has five sizes but six colours. There’s also a hooded version which costs an extra £20.

Likes: extremely smart appearance, durable
Dislikes: fairly heavy

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