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Lost Valley Bridge closure

Walkers heading into the Lost Valley and Gearr Aonach in Glencoe will have to use an alternative approach as the Coire Gabhail bridge will be closed for repairs for 8 weeks from 19 June.

The National Trust for Scotland (NTS) is carrying out essential repair work to the bridge and walkers and climbers will need to use the alternative bridge at Coire Nan Lochan (NN 167 567) a short distance further west along the River Coe instead. The bridge will be closed until 6 August and walkers approaching the Lost Valley, Bidean nam Bian and the Three Sisters will need to use the Coire Nan Lochan bridge. The repair work includes new steps on the north side, a metal rope handrail on the south side and the bridge itself will have new decking, side and hand rails. The closure will be signed at all the major access points to the bridge and the NTS has apologised for any inconvenience during this time.

Property Manager Scott McCombie said: “We’re working closely with the contractors to keep any disruption to a minimum, and of course, to minimise the environmental impact of carrying out building work at this high altitude.”

Scott emphasised the importance of walkers’ knowing their routes in the area and following signs onsite. He said: “We would urge everyone planning to walk in the area to please heed the signs that are there and to follow advice on alternative routes. We want people to enjoy their time in the hills and to be as safe as is possible.”

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    Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.