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NTS offers high level Glencoe walks

The National Trust for Scotland’s Glencoe will mark the UN International Year of Biodiversity by giving visitors the opportunity to experience some of its highest mountains in a series of special ranger-led hikes. The challenging, high-level walks, which each take in a wide variety of habitats, begin on the International Day of Biodiversity – Saturday 22 May.

Property Manager Scott McCombie said: “As a site of special scientific interest and home to a vast number of plant and animal species, Glencoe is the perfect place to celebrate biodiversity. I’m sure hikers will enjoy spotting the creatures that live on its mountains as much as the beautiful views they can see from its summits.”

The full programme is listed below:

Buachaille Etive Beag – On Saturday 22 May and Saturday 16 October walkers will have the chance to hike the Buachaille Etive Beag ridge in the company of an expert Trust ranger.

Buachaille Etive Mòr – The ridge of Buachaille Etive Mòr will be explored on Saturday 19 June and Saturday 21 August. The iconic ridge is home to a diverse range of wildlife.

Bidean Nam Bian – Glencoe’s highest mountain, Bidean nam Bian, will be scaled on Saturday 24 July and Saturday 18 September. The walk promises stunning views and the chance to spot wildlife too.

All walks meet for 9.00 at the Visitor Centre and last until around 18.00. Walkers should bring walking boots, waterproof clothing, a packed lunch with a drink and general equipment suitable for a full day’s hike in the Scottish hills. A high level of fitness is required for all three walks.

The walks cost £25, for over 18s only. Booking is essential, and can be carried out by calling 0844 493 2222.


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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.