walkhighlands

Gear reviews

A Greener Gear Guide, Part 1

In the first part of a short series, David Lintern looks at choosing clothes and kit that work for you, how to extend the life of your gear, plus some of the eco-labelling to look out for when buying. Responding

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine

Gear review: Patagonia Micro-Puff Hoody

Recommended Price: £200 – £250Weight: 295g (men’s large) The Micro-Puff is a truly ultra-light mid-layer jacket. Patagonia state the weight as being 264g – my large comes in at 295g and packs down to a tiny size in its own

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Posted in Gear reviews, Jackets, Magazine, Midlayers

Gear review: Vaude Rienza pull-over II

Recommended Price: £70Weight: 385g (men’s large) Fleece jackets (and sweaters) were once the ubiquitous outdoors kit. Easily to wash, pretty durable, comfy to wear and warm for the weight, it’s easy to see how they expanded out from being walkers’

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Midlayers

Gear review: Alpkit Presta 20l pack

Recommended Price: £44.99Weight: 645g (as reviewed) This small pack from Alpkit is just the size for a day hike when you have compact kit and don’t need any winter gear. Despite the diminutive dimensions, the pack is actually pretty fully

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Rucksacks

Berghaus Paclite Gore-Tex Overtrousers

Recommended Price: £110Weight: 226g (Men’s M, Regular length) Walking in the rain is pretty impossible to avoid in Scotland, even for the most fair weather of walkers. Waterproof overtrousers are in my pack all year round and for the last

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Trousers

Gear Review: Vaude Skomer Skort

RRP: £80 (available for less in many outlets)Weight: 115g (size XXS) The long hot summer of 2018 saw skorts enter the mainstream of Scottish hillwalking kit. A skirt with a shorts liner, skorts have actually been around for a while.

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Trousers




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.