walkhighlands

Magazine

Bare hill of the hind

Are deer eating us out of house and home? David Lintern weighs the evidence in the latest battle for the heart of the beast. Red Deer may be Scottish icons, but they represent much more than a shortbread tin version

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Getting to know the robin in my car

When I get back to the car safely after a long and tiring walk in the hills I remove my shoes, pour myself tea from my flask, and then I sit down in the open car boot. This is my

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Posted in Magazine

Gear of the Year 2016 – Part One

David Lintern begins his round up of some of his favourites from an outdoors year in gear. OK, so the easy rhyme of the title aside, this is not the definitive list… because no such thing exists. It’s just my

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine


Roads Less Travelled – Sutherland, Caithness and Orkney

I’M beginning to feel a little like the Rev IM Jolly. The only time the Glesca clergyman and I are on the telly is at Christmas! This year our two hour-long programmes feature a campervan journey between Dornoch Point in

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Posted in Magazine

Towards better winter photos

David Lintern shares a few tips and tricks for photos in the finest season of them all. It seems ages since we’ve done one of these photography articles, and the start of the winter season is as good an opportunity

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Posted in Magazine, Photography

Heaven is….. sunny, dry, cold and calm

As I sit here at home I can hear the surging roar of approaching gusts of wind. They’re whooshing through the tree branches and clunking at the wheelie bins. They’re whistling through tiny gaps in the double glazing, prompting a

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Posted in Magazine



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