walkhighlands

Magazine

Red squirrels move to Sutherland in new project

Conservation charities Trees for Life and Woodland Trust Scotland have partnered up to return red squirrels to a Sutherland wood…

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine, Walking News

Accessing An Cladach Bothy on Islay

Following news of the autumn/winter closure of An Cladach bothy including discussions on Walkhighlands, the Mountain Bothy Association have issued this statement: “Dunlossit Estate, the owners of An Cladach bothy on Islay, have asked us to clarify both the parking

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Posted in Magazine, Walking News

Gear review: Alpkit Presta 20l pack

Recommended Price: £44.99Weight: 645g (as reviewed) This small pack from Alpkit is just the size for a day hike when you have compact kit and don’t need any winter gear. Despite the diminutive dimensions, the pack is actually pretty fully

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Posted in Gear reviews, Magazine, Rucksacks

Land of Ghosts

John D. Burns is an award-winning writer who has spent over forty years exploring Britain’s mountains. A past member of the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue Team, he has walked and climbed in the American and Canadian Rockies, Kenya, the Alps and the

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

What does a ranger actually do?

I’m currently in my seventh ranger season. I say ‘season’ because I’m a seasonal ranger. We get employed during the busier, warmer months when more folk are flocking to the great outdoors, whether that’s urban green spaces, Country Parks, or

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine

Landowner told to remove track scarring Cairngorms hill

A landowner in the Cairngorms National Park has been ordered to remove a controversial vehicle track that is visible from miles around in scenic Glen Clova, Angus. Campaigners have welcomed Cairngorms National Park Authority’s enforcement notice against the ugly vehicle

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.