walkhighlands

Conservation

Land of Ghosts

John D. Burns is an award-winning writer who has spent over forty years exploring Britain’s mountains. A past member of the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue Team, he has walked and climbed in the American and Canadian Rockies, Kenya, the Alps and the

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

What does a ranger actually do?

I’m currently in my seventh ranger season. I say ‘season’ because I’m a seasonal ranger. We get employed during the busier, warmer months when more folk are flocking to the great outdoors, whether that’s urban green spaces, Country Parks, or

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine

Landowner told to remove track scarring Cairngorms hill

A landowner in the Cairngorms National Park has been ordered to remove a controversial vehicle track that is visible from miles around in scenic Glen Clova, Angus. Campaigners have welcomed Cairngorms National Park Authority’s enforcement notice against the ugly vehicle

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine

Farming and crofting in the Cairngorms National Park

Anne Rae MacDonald is a board member of the Cairngorms National Park, and a partner in a family farming business in Easter Ross. She is also a member of Scotland’s Women in Agriculture Taskforce set up in 2017 by the Scottish

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Posted in Conservation

Walkers urged to check for deer stalking before Heading for the Scottish Hills

Hillwalkers are being encouraged to check online for deer stalking information before setting out during the busiest part of the season. Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) manages the Heading for the Scottish Hills website which provides details on deer stalking on

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine, Walking News

Fires – a burning issue

With photos of campfire rings and damage left in the pinewoods circulating on social media, Adam Streeter-Smith, Access Officer for the Cairngorms National Park authority, takes on a hot topic, asking just what is responsible behaviour. Picture the scene –

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.