walkhighlands

Conservation

Environmental groups respond to SNH deer management report

Red deer

A coalition of environmental organisations have welcomed improvements in the functioning of deer management groups while warning that a step change is needed if climate and biodiversity targets are to be met. A report published today by Scottish Natural Heritage

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Posted in Conservation

Coalition of local and conservation groups call for new Cairn Gorm vision

A group of conservation organisations and local groups has come together to publish a new joint vision for the future of Cairn Gorm. The group – comprising Ramblers Scotland, the Cairngorms Campaign, the North East Mountain Trust, the Scottish Wild

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Wildcats to be re-introduced in Scotland

Scottish wildcats bred in captivity are to re-introduced into the wild after funding was secured for the project Situated at the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Highland Wildlife Park near Aviemore, a new re-introduction centre will provide facilities for breeding,

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Red squirrels move to Sutherland in new project

Conservation charities Trees for Life and Woodland Trust Scotland have partnered up to return red squirrels to a Sutherland wood…

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine, Walking News

Land of Ghosts

John D. Burns is an award-winning writer who has spent over forty years exploring Britain’s mountains. A past member of the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue Team, he has walked and climbed in the American and Canadian Rockies, Kenya, the Alps and the

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

What does a ranger actually do?

I’m currently in my seventh ranger season. I say ‘season’ because I’m a seasonal ranger. We get employed during the busier, warmer months when more folk are flocking to the great outdoors, whether that’s urban green spaces, Country Parks, or

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.