walkhighlands

Conservation

Welcome back – but be responsible

It’s going to be great to once again have freedom to travel around Scotland more than 5 miles from home, from Friday 3rd July. But we need to all think carefully when planning where we head out beyond our local

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine, Walkhighlands news, Walking News

Scotland’s mountain hares gain protected status

The unlicensed mass culling of mountain hares has been outlawed, in a landmark amendment passed at Holyrood last night. The rural affairs minister Mairi Gougeon announced that the Scottish Government would back the amendment, which was proposed by Green parliamentary

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Legal killing of 1-in-5 Scottish beavers spotlights need for fresh approach

The killing of 87 beavers in Scotland – one fifth of the country’s population – proves there is an urgent need for humans to live more sympathetically alongside beavers across Britain, the Beaver Trust has said. The Trust said lethal

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Dear oh Deer: Scotland’s land use saga continues

Deer are our largest and most populous wild mammal – Are they also an icon of our feudal past, or a conservation whipping boy? David Lintern exhumes the bones of an ongoing debate.

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine

Coul links plans rejected

The Scottish Government has today rejected plans to built an 18 hole golf course on the internationally protected Coul Links dune system, north of Dornoch. The plans had been opposed by environmental groups and charities, including Ramblers Scotland, Buglife, Butterfly

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation

Environmental groups welcome new Deer Working Group report

Scottish Environment LINK – a coalition of organisations involved in land and deer management, forestry, wildlife conservation, cultural heritage community, land partnerships, nature education and outdoor recreation – has welcomed the findings in the report published today by the independent

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Posted in Conservation




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.