walkhighlands



Wild swimming: Where have you been all my life!?

I always enjoyed messing about in water when I was younger but I’m not sure I ever truly enjoyed swimming in it. I certainly wasn’t a bad swimmer, in fact I took part in inter-school competitions, but I think it

Read more ›

Posted in Magazine

Seeing past the wasp sting

A wasp found its way into my flat and settled on my windowsill recently. Being the snap-happy nature nut that I am, I don’t discriminate with my lens and therefore seized the opportunity to get a close-up photo of this

Read more ›

Posted in Magazine

The Winter Without End: A Review

Mid May would normally seem a late time of year to reminisce about the winter we’ve just enjoyed/endured (delete as appropriate), but it was only a few weeks ago that my road was blocked by 3ft snowdrifts. That’s lovely for

Read more ›

Posted in Magazine

The Common Frog: Hopping for a good spring!

The first frogspawn of the year usually takes me by surprise. It shouldn’t of course, because it’s an annual event as reliable as the first green shoots of grass rising from the barren, brown hillsides. But when I see those

Read more ›

Posted in Magazine

Saving Red Squirrels

Back in November I wrote a piece for Walkhighlands about pine martens, in which I referred to a study that was underway at the time into their intriguing relationship with both red and grey squirrels. The results of that study

Read more ›

Posted in Conservation, Magazine

The Sparrowhawk PR Problem

Last week, as I was sat at home, I heard a loud but unfamiliar squawk outside followed by alarm calls from smaller birds. When I looked out the window I saw a starling on the ground, motionless under the tight

Read more ›

Posted in Conservation, Magazine



  • Accessories
  • Baselayers
  • Books
  • Camping
  • Footwear
  • Jackets
  • Rucksacks
  • Trousers
  • browse the
    ARCHIVES
  • 2018 (94)
  • 2017 (161)
  • 2016 (160)
  • 2015 (207)
  • 2014 (282)
  • 2013 (257)
  • 2012 (274)
  • 2011 (376)
  • 2010 (274)
  • 2009 (126)
  • 2008 (77)
  • Share on 

    Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.