walkhighlands



Discovering Aviemore

In the 25 years that I have been visiting Aviemore, the size of the Scottish Highlands town and the volume of people that stroll the streets has vastly increased. Some might say that this has been to the detriment of

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Posted in Magazine

Exploring Ullapool

Sitting on a low wall edging the shoreline of beautiful Loch Broom in the Ross-shire town of Ullapool, a takeaway container of delicious crab cakes and salad on my knee and a day of mountain walking in my legs, I

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Posted in Magazine

Exploring Dunoon

Climbing the steep path and numerous uneven stone-slab steps through deeply moss-covered Puck’s Glen on the Cowal Peninsula, it is easy to imagine I have been transported to another world. Is that the hushed voices of mischievous sprites casting their

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Posted in Magazine


Discovering Torridon

In my opinion, there are few glens in Scotland as dramatic as Torridon and a drive along the road that winds through the base of the glacier-eroded valley is always breath-taking. No matter the season or the weather – and

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Posted in Magazine

Exploring the outdoors around Glasgow

Despite being Scotland’s biggest city, it is surprisingly easy to leave Glasgow behind for a remote-feeling countryside adventure. Head out of the city boundaries in almost every direction and you discover farmland, hills and mountains that seem to pop up

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Posted in Magazine

A visit to Colonsay and Oronsay

You might imagine a tiny, low-lying Scottish island in the middle of the Atlantic, 20 miles from any other community and with only a lighthouse between it and the coast of Canada to the west, to be an inhospitable place.

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Posted in Magazine



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