walkhighlands



John Allen – 35 years of mountain rescue

David Lintern interviews John Allen to ask – what has changed for hillgoers and the civilian rescue service, and what is the same?

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Posted in Magazine

Signs, sticks and stones

When is a pile of stones a work of art, a historical monument or an act of vandalism, and how much signage do we want in the Scottish Hills? David Lintern considers cairns, signposts, interpretation and other human interventions, both

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Posted in Access issues, Conservation, Magazine

Looking after what we love?

Scotland’s environmental record so far this year isn’t that easy to digest, but David Lintern has had a go… It’s 2018, and god knows there’s a lot of bad news competing for our attention. But in a slight change to

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine, Walking News

Team Heavy and the Big Rig ride out

Walkhighlands, or bikehighlands? This time it’s a temporary two wheeled takeover, as David Lintern and family take to their steeds to reach the parts that little legs can’t quite manage. Getting a young family out and about is harder than

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Posted in Magazine

Early days of a better nature

David Lintern reports on the ‘Rewilding and Repeopling‘ event held by the Cairngorms National Park last month. In May, Cairngorms National Park held an interesting talk at Boat of Garten as part of their Big Weekend (which aims to encourage

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Posted in Magazine

Glenlude – A place for people

David Lintern builds the right kind of border wall – a dry stone dyke in the Borders. “I like it here, it has a nice feel. And it’s great that it’s local to me”, says Ellen. With nothing more to

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Posted in Magazine



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