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Travel and Coronavirus

Temporary Coronavirus restrictions and travel advice applies until 2nd November, when new guidance will be introduced.
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Photography

National Parks Photography Winners

The UK National Parks and Campaign for National Parks have chosen the winner and runners up of its joint photography competition.  Around the theme of a ‘Inspired By Nature’, the competition drew around 1,700 entries from across the 15 National

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Posted in Magazine, Photography, Walking News

The Return of the Taghan

Despite centuries of persecution and habitat loss, pine martens have proven themselves to be survivors, and as they expand their range, they’re revealing some surprising secrets.

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine, Photography

Top award for renowned Scottish landscape photographer, Colin Prior

Colin Prior, the founding father of landscape photography in Scotland, wins the Scottish Award for Excellence in Mountain Culture 2020 Organisers of The Fort William Mountain Festival are pleased to announce that Colin Prior, the World-renowned photographer from Glasgow who has made the

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Posted in Photography, Walking News

Shooting the Breeze – Anke Addy

Our occasional series of interviews with photographers living and working in Scotland continues. David Lintern speaks to Cairngorms afficionado, Anke Addy.

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Posted in Magazine, Photography

Watching otters in Scotland

An encounter with an otter in the wild is a magical experience. Helen Webster takes a look at the best places to spot otters, how to boost your chances of a sighting, and tips to avoid disturbing these amazing creatures.

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Posted in Our picks, Photography

Monarch or Menace?

Scotland’s largest land mammal is also one of its most contentious. Photographer and Director of SCOTLAND: The Big Picture, Peter Cairns, explores the ecological and cultural divide over the Monarch of the Glen.

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Posted in Conservation, Magazine, Photography




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Walking can be dangerous and is done entirely at your own risk. Information is provided free of charge; it is each walker's responsibility to check it and navigate using a map and compass.